Workout Wednesday: Shoulder Rehabilitation Exercises

Workout Wednesday: Shoulder Rehabilitation Exercises

This week in Workout Wednesday Jack and Mark demonstrate basic shoulder exercises to strengthen the stabilizing and postural muscles around the shoulder blades.

Conservative management for people with shoulder impingement normally includes exercise therapy to strengthen the rotator cuff muscles as well as scapular stabilising muscles. Research has shown that exercise therapy can be just as effective as surgical intervention for the reduction of shoulder pain in people with shoulder impingement. The goal of exercise therapy is to increase the strength, endurance and/or muscular hypertrophy of the scapula stabilising and rotator cuff muscles. Control and progression of exercise variables including intensity, duration, frequency and load are crucial to achieve this. However, most clinical research studies in exercise for shoulder impingement vary widely in their prescription of exercise and do not closely control these exercise variables.
Method: A recent research study looked at the benefits of a closely controlled progressive resistance training program for people diagnosed with sub-acromial shoulder impingement. Participants in this study were assigned to either a progressive resistance training (PRT) group or a control group which performed no exercise. Participants in the PRT group participated in exercise therapy to strengthen the muscles around the shoulder twice per week for 2 months. The exercise variables in this study were closely monitored and progressed over the 2 months to optimise increases in muscle hypertrophy, strength and endurance.

– This extract was taken from Monday’s blog article ‘Progressive Resistance Training for Shoulder Impingement’ by Jack Hickey. Read it here: http://www.mdhealth.com.au/progressive-resistance-training-for-shoulder-impingement/

Workout Wednesday: Shoulder Rehabilitation Exercises

Progressive Resistance Training for Shoulder Impingement

Progressive Resistance Training for Shoulder Impingement

Background

Conservative management for people with shoulder impingement normally includes exercise therapy to strengthen the rotator cuff muscles as well as scapular stabilising muscles. Research has shown that exercise therapy can be just as effective as surgical intervention for the reduction of shoulder pain in people with shoulder impingement. The goal of exercise therapy is to increase the strength, endurance and/or muscular hypertrophy of the scapula stabilising and rotator cuff muscles. Control and progression of exercise variables including intensity, duration, frequency and load are crucial to achieve this. However, most clinical research studies in exercise for shoulder impingement vary widely in their prescription of exercise and do not closely control these exercise variables.

Method

A recent research study looked at the benefits of a closely controlled progressive resistance training program for people diagnosed with sub-acromial shoulder impingement. Participants in this study were assigned to either a progressive resistance training (PRT) group or a control group which performed no exercise. Participants in the PRT group participated in exercise therapy to strengthen the muscles around the shoulder twice per week for 2 months. The exercise variables in this study were closely monitored and progressed over the 2 months to optimise increases in muscle hypertrophy, strength and endurance.

Results

After the 2 month intervention, participants in the PRT group significantly decreased shoulder pain at rest and during movement as well as improvements in shoulder and upper limb function, where as the control group made no improvements. Participants in the PRT group also reported taking significantly less pain analgesics and NSAIDs compared to the control group at the completion of the 2 month intervention.

Clinical Implications

Whilst the benefits of exercise therapy for shoulder impingement have been previously shown, this study highlights the need for specific exercise prescription to optimise improvements in shoulder pain and function for people with shoulder impingement. When prescribing exercise for shoulder impingement, if the goal of the exercise therapy is to increase muscle hypertrophy, strength or endurance the intensity, frequency, duration and load should be closely monitored and progressed to achieve these goals, just as in any exercise program.
Lombardi, I., Magri, A. G., Fleury, A. M., Da Silva, A. C., & Natour, J. (2008). Progressive resistance training in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome: a randomized controlled trial. Arthritis Care & Research, 59(5), 615-622.

Link to Article – http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/art.23576/pdf

By Jack Hickey
Exercise Physiologist at MD Health

Pilates for Seniors – MD Health Pilates

Pilates for Seniors – MD Health Pilates

Pilates for Seniors

Clinical Pilates is a great program not just for the young, but if your older and want to stay young at heart. We have been running Clinical Pilates for the last 10 years and specifically started our Pilates for seniors (over 60’s) earlier this year with great results for all involved (the oldest was 93!)

What are the Benefits of Pilates if you’re over 60?

1. Improved overall strength: One of the biggest causes of lack of mobility and reduction in your freedom to move and do the things you would like to do in your life is a lack of strength. Age only has a minor impact on strength; it is due much more to lack of strength training. Clinical Pilates is excellent for building strength, in a safe, controlled and supervised environment

2. Improved Balance: Clinical Pilates has a strong element that works on balance as well as strength. Balance can be tested and exercises specifically designed to address the factors phentermine weight loss that have the biggest affect on your balance

3. Benefits to help manage type 2 diabetes: Strength training has been shown to be an important element in helping manage diabetes, by improving muscle mass and the number of glucose senses in muscle, improving glucose management in diabetes

4. Improved quality of life: The biggest and most important reason for doing Clinical Pilates is that you will find that the things you want to do with your life such as, gardening, looking after your grandkids, going travelling, playing golf will become easier and your body should not limit you in doing these activities

bigstockphoto_Young_Children_Enjoying_The_Ou_1949688What is involved in Pilates for Seniors?

After your initial, full body assessment, we will customise your Clinical Pilates program to meet your individual goals and needs. You can attend Clinical Pilates once or twice a week (Ideally twice a week) and each session is supervised, controlled and monitored by our Physiotherapists and Exercise Physiologists, to make sure all exercises meet your needs

MD Health Clinical Pilates – Workout Wednesday – The Perfect Squat Part 2

MD Health Clinical Pilates – Workout Wednesday – The Perfect Squat Part 2

Following on from last week’s Workout Wednesday video, this week we show you how to perform an intermediate and advanced version of the squat exercise with perfect technique

Again, these are more advanced exercises for knee pain, especially PFJ (Patello-femoral joint pain) and are also a great exercise for pelvic instability and ankle stability issues. As always, control of the knee, hip and ankle is important. When you start your squat exercise, make sure that the inside muscle of the thigh, the VMO muscle ( vastus medialis oblique) is contracted, to keep control of the knee cap as you perform the squat.

Squats are a great, general exercise for lower leg, as it requires control of all the major joints of the legs, the pelvic, hips, knees and ankle, as it involves eccentric control of all these joints. Eccentric exercises require the most control and load the tendons up the most, which is the best for motor learning and building strength.

More specifically, squats are primarily an exercise for the Patello-femoral joint. The patello-femoral-joint is the joint between the patella (knee cap) and the intercondylar notch of the femur, where the patella tracks during flexion and extension of the knee. This tracking of the patella is largely influenced by the balance between lateral and medial forces acting upon it. The majority of the lateral force acting on the PFJ come from the vastus lateralis (VL) component of the quadriceps muscle and the ilio-tibial-band (ITB). The medial forces acting upon the PFJ are controlled by the vastus medialis (VM) muscle, particularly the oblique portion of this muscle referred to as VMO.
Extract taken from our blog article ‘Patello-Femoral-Joint (PFJ) Knee Pain Explained’ by Jack Hickey