Is Pilates a good substitute for strength training?

In general, clinical and reformer based Pilates is strength training.  The wonderful thing about reformer based Pilates is that it not only works on the obvious power muscles that you generally tend to work in the gym, but you also target the stabilising muscles, the muscles that control movement, which makes training more efficient and effective.

The main elements of Pilates which makes it a great strength training program are:

  1. Reformer Pilates is resistance based – when using the reformer, a good instructor will set the weight of the reformer a little bit heavier than you are comfortable pushing or pulling.  This gives the muscles a stimulus to grow and strengthen overtime.
  2. The exercises have a purpose – the great thing about Pilates is that it is not like lifting a random weight in a random direction.  The movements and exercises that you perform match what you would do in everyday life, so your body and mind learn movements that they will use outside of the gym or studio, which makes them much more useful and improve your “functional” strength.
  3. The Pilates exercises have a balance component of training – Pilates exercises on the reformer, if instructed properly, are never one dimensional.  They will also work on your balance as well as your strength, to make then even more useful in real life and in any kind of sport you pursue.

For more information about this article, please email:michael.dermansky@mdhealth.com.au

To book for your FREE full body assessment, call us on 03 9857 0644. We are open Mondays to Thursdays from m7am to 9pm; & Fridays & Saturdays from 7am-2pm. Parking is easy. We are located at 737 High Street, East Kew.

How often should I do Pilates to get results?

How often should I do Pilates to get results?

Like all good strength training programs, Pilates should be performed 2 to 3 times a week (ideally 3 times) for the best results.

For muscles to grow effectively, they need to be loaded and worked, then given a chance to rest and grow, then loaded again.

This cycle works best when performed 2-3 times a week.  Less than this is just not enough of a stimulus to the muscles to grow in the long term and more than this does not give the muscles enough of a chance to recover and grow between training sessions, ending in injury or a very quick plateau effect.

In general, the fastest rate of growth of muscle occurs in the first 3 months of a training program. However, growth of the muscles and strength continues to occur for at least 12 months or more, at a slower rate.

Clients who have been with us for many years have felt the benefits from the program after the first 9-12 months and progressively improve year after year.

Written by: Michael Dermansky – Senior Physiotherapist

If you’re interested in joining our 13 week Pilates program, book your FREE full body assessment on 03 9857 0644 or enquire online. We are open from Mondays to Saturdays and parking is easy. We are located at East Kew (737 High Street).

Preventing Ankle Sprains in the Workplace

Preventing Ankle Sprains in the Workplace

Our feet are our main mode of transport, carrying us on a journey of 128,000 kilometres in a lifetime – a distance equivalent to three times around the world!

Ankle joints and feet are the link between your body and the ground. The tips below are to help you move well, stay well and assist in reducing the risk and severity of ankle sprains in the workplace.

Footwear

  • With every step, shock is absorbed by the feet, knees, hips and spine to decrease the force of impact. Wearing the correct footwear will help to reduce these forces further whilst not affecting the normal function of the foot.
  • Wearing the right footwear for the job protects you from stress-related injury to the ankles, knees, hips and spine.
  • Wear activity-specific, well-fitting shoes, use spots strapping tape or an ankle brace to provide good ankle joint support (see your physiotherapist for advice on the correct support).

Surfaces

  • Avoid activities on slippery or uneven surfaces and in areas with poor lighting.

Exercise

  • Keep your leg muscles strong, especially your calf and ankle muscles to help protect the ligaments
  • Practice standing on one leg to improve your balance and leg muscle strength.
  • Simple exercise such as walking or swimming is the best.
  • Make sure you warm up before and cool down after exercise with gentle stretches.

Article by the Australian Physiotherapy Association as a part of Tradies National Health Month.
For more information visit http://www.tradieshealth.com.au/

Preventing Neck Pain

Preventing Neck Pain

As the neck is so mobile and balances a heavy head on top of it, it can be easily strained. The most common causes of neck pain include:

Injury, resulting from motor vehicle, sports or occupational accidents. Examples include ‘whiplash’ and muscle strains.

Postural problems, such as slouching your shoulders, sleeping with your head in an awkward position, or working with your head in an awkward position (most commonly down) for long periods.

Below is some useful advice to help you control and prevent neck pain:

 

Posture

  • Think tall, chest lifted, shoulders relaxed, chin tucked in and head level.
  • Posture should be stable, balanced and relaxed

Sleeping

  • If you are a side sleeper, a pillow with adequate support is important and a contour under the neck is advised.
  • If you are a back sleeper, a small pillow is recommended to focus the support under your neck area as feels comfortable.
  • Avoid sleeping on your stomach.

Relaxation

  • Recognise when you are tense. You may be hunching your shoulders or clenching your teeth without realising it.
  • Only when we are aware of tension can we work to release it. Mindfulness meditation can help.

Work

  • Avoid working with your head down or to one side for long periods. Frequently stretch and change position.

 

Article by the Australian Physiotherapy Association as a part of Tradies National Health Month.
For more information visit http://www.tradieshealth.com.au/

Improving the MD Health Pilates Program

Improving our Pilates program, service and your outcomes has been and will continue to be one of our major goals at MD Health Pilates.  At the moment, we have been working on these aspects of our program to be launched in the next version of our software (version 6fii).

1. Real time ultrasound imaging of the shoulder – Nicholas has recently undertaken further training in musculo-skeletal ultrasound imaging and has now taught all the other staff how to image the muscles and tendons. We have now further practiced and refined our skills through several in-services and worked out our standard protocols for testing the shoulder.  This will now be used as a standard test when you have a shoulder injury

2. Headache assessment and treatment – Mark Charalambous, former physiotherapist at MD Health Pilates, recently trained all of our staff in better assessment and treatment techniques for neck related headaches.  We have now further fine-tuned this process and incorporated it into the new version of our software.

3. Better hip assessment and specific treatment – Since we started incorporating new research and techniques for treating hip injuries over the last two years, we have a much better idea of what works well and what doesn’t.  These changes will also be included in our new software and testing procedure.

4. Tendon injuries in general – Both Nicholas and Jacinta had done excellent training and taught the other staff how to specifically assess and treat tendon and tendonopathy injuries.  We have re-written the process of how to better progress tendon rehabilitation programs throughout the healing process for the best outcomes

5. Heart and other cardiovascular conditions – If you have had heart related issues, you have probably found that we have been asking to rated your effort during an exercise or session out of 10 (RPE) or 20 (Borg scale) to determine the safest level of exercise for you.  We have now worked to make this process easier to record and keep a track of during your sessions

6. Home exercises – We are in the process of updating our range of home exercises and working to mare the process faster and more specific to each individual

 

Michael Dermansky

Physiotherapist and Managing Director

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