High Intensity Interval Training Workout

High Intensity Interval Training Workout

Sick and tired of doing the same old cardio workout and want to get the extra edge with your training? Here are some example High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) workouts which you can try and apply to improve your regular workout, whether that be running, walking, cycling, swimming or boxing. The workouts below all use work intensities of 80% of maximum effort or heart rate (HR) and 60% of maximum effort or HR, with varying interval lengths and workout durations depending on fitness level from beginner to advanced.

If you have access to a heart rate monitor you can use age predicted maximum HR to gauge your exercise intensity. To calculate age predicted maximum HR, the easiest method is to use the age predicted method which is 220 beats per minute (BPM) – your age in years. For example if you are 35 years old, your age predicted maximum heart rate is 220 – 35 = 185BPM. So 80% of your max HR would be 185 x 0.85 = 157BPM.

Alternatively you can use a simple generic viagra in usa subjective perception of effort 0-10 scale, where 0 = complete rest and 10 = maximal exercise capacity. For more information on the benefits of HIIT, please refer to our previous blog post at this link:

What is High Intensity Interval Training

Beginner HIIT

Duration – 15 minutes

Work to Rest ratio – 1:3

Work Interval – 15 seconds @ 8/10 or 80% Max HR

Rest Interval – 45 seconds @ 6/10 or 60% Max HR

Intermediate HIIT

Duration – 30 minutes

Work to Rest ratio – 1:2

Work Interval – 30 seconds @ 8/10 or 80% Max HR

Rest Interval – 1 minute @ 6/10 or 60% Max HR

Advanced HIIT

Duration – 30 minutes

Work to Rest ratio – 1:1

Work Interval – 30 seconds @ 8/10 or 80% Max HR

Rest Interval – 30 seconds @ 6/10 or 60% Max HR


Written By Jack Hickey
Exercise Physiologist at MD Health Pilates

HIIT at MD Health

HIIT at MD Health

HIIT at MD Health – How is It Different?

When we first introduced HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training) our specific aim was to make a real difference in our client’s cardiovascular fitness, not just another way to merely burn kilojoules.  This involved extensive research into effective cardio training and the result was the following principles in our program:

    • We use three main types of energy systems for performance, aerobic, anaerobic and alactic. All are important for sport, especially most team sports such as football, netball, basketball
    • To make a change in fitness, we need to work at the “edge” to your aerobic, anaerobic and alactic thresholds
    • The heart is a muscle, like other muscles and needs to be overloaded in order to improve
    • We can work on improving the endurance of these systems or improving the threshold of these energy systems, both important targets for fitness

HIIT

What Does This Mean For You ?

The result is a true improvement in your fitness, which means:

  • It is less effort to do the normal things in your life, such as going for walk, doing the groceries, going for a bike ride
  • Improvements in heart function and blood pressure
  • Improvements in sports performance, such as the ability to sprint, recover between sprints and speed of sprinting

What Happens During the HIIT Session?

During a session, your heart rate is always monitored, so that each interval is specific for you to work on your target heart rate, within your target energy zone.  The Physiotherapist/Exercise Physiologist varies the speed, time and resistance of each interval so that you always work within your target heart rate, to always get the most effective cardio training. At MD Health we offer cycling and boxing HIIT classes.

For more on HIIT, read our article:

What is High Intensity Interval Training

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