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Pelvic Floor: Part One

Pelvic Floor: Part One

Don’t Forget Your Pelvic Floor!

If you or someone you care for experiences bladder or bowel control problems, you’re certainly not alone. In fact, over 4.8 million Australians experience bladder or bowel control problems.
Urinary incontinence affects up to 13% men and 37% of women in Australia alone and 70% of these people do not seek advice or treatment.

The most common risk factors of developing urinary incontinence are:
-Pregnancy (pre and post natal)
-Menopause
-Obesity
-Urinary tract infections
-Constipation
-Surgeries such as prostatectomy and hysterectomy
-Reduced mobility due to neurological or musculo-skeletal conditions
-Health conditions such as heart disease/diabetes/stroke

Incontinence of any level is nothing to be embarrassed about, this is a real problem and it is very important to seek help and advice.

Your pelvic floor is a secondary control of your bladder. The urethra sphincter (muscle that controls amount of urine expelled from the bladder) is stretched during childbirth and so we rely heavily on the pelvic floor to take the rest of the slack. Strengthening your pelvic floor is a must pre and post pregnancy.

We are lucky enough to have access to Real-time Ultrasound and use this as a tool to assess your ability to activate your pelvic floor. From here we are able to prescribe the right exercises for you and we can teach you how to improve your pelvic floor for prevention or treatment of urinary incontinence.

Next week we will post more information on how to go about improving your pelvic floor and what not to do! So stay tuned!

Don’t forget to ask one of our Physiotherapists or Exercise Physiologists about a Pelvic Floor assessment.

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Article by Beth Chiuchiarelli, Exercise Phsiologist at MD Health

Pelvic Joint Dysfunction in Pregnancy

Pelvic Joint Dysfunction in Pregnancy

Pelvic Joint Dysfunction in Pregnancy

Pelvic Joint Dysfunction is a common problem during pregnancy and is related to hormonal effects on the ligaments/joints, weight gain and postural changes during pregnancy.

This blog article will help you with the common problems associated with pelvic joint dysfunction during pregnancy. It should be used in combination with MD Health’s Physiotherapist’s/Exercise Physiologist’s advice.

Pelvic Joint Dysfunction in Pregnancy

The pain associated with this problem tends to occur when there has been asymmetrical distribution of forces (i.e. putting more weight through one leg compared with the other).

Activities that may aggravate the pain:

  • Walking up stairs
  • Poor posture
  • Getting in/out of bed or the car
  • Jogging, long walks
  • Prolonged standing
  • Rolling side to side in bed
  • Single leg stance

Activities that may help relieve/reduce the pain:

  • Try and keep distribution of forces equal between the legs
  • When rolling in bed, put a pillow between your knees and roll with knees together on either side of the pillow
  • When getting in or out of the car, try and keep order ativan online your knee together and swivel on your bottom
  • When walking, use smaller steps to decrease the time spent on one leg
  • When walking, maintain good posture and try not to waddle because this places increasing stress on the spine and hips
  • Ensure that you use correct sitting and standing postures
  • Abdominal and buttock muscle strengthening exercises-  incorporate these into activities of daily living whenever possible:
    1. Gently lift your pelvic floor muscles and pull your lower abdominal’s in toward your spine
    2. Squeeze your bottom (particularly when lifting or getting up from sitting)
    3. Keep your back upright
    4. Keep breathing normally
  • Pelvic tilting
  • When seated, use arms to take more of the load (i.e. pushing off a chair with arms rather than an increased force through the legs)
  • Rest in horizontal position
  • Wear flat heels-well cushioned insole
  • You may need an abdominal brace to help decrease the load on the pelvis

 

Written by Michael Dermanksy

Senior Physiotherapist and founder of MD Health