Pelvic Joint Dysfunction in Pregnancy

Pelvic Joint Dysfunction in Pregnancy

Pelvic Joint Dysfunction in Pregnancy

Pelvic Joint Dysfunction is a common problem during pregnancy and is related to hormonal effects on the ligaments/joints, weight gain and postural changes during pregnancy.

This blog article will help you with the common problems associated with pelvic joint dysfunction during pregnancy. It should be used in combination with MD Health’s Physiotherapist’s/Exercise Physiologist’s advice.

Pelvic Joint Dysfunction in Pregnancy

The pain associated with this problem tends to occur when there has been asymmetrical distribution of forces (i.e. putting more weight through one leg compared with the other).

Activities that may aggravate the pain:

  • Walking up stairs
  • Poor posture
  • Getting in/out of bed or the car
  • Jogging, long walks
  • Prolonged standing
  • Rolling side to side in bed
  • Single leg stance

Activities that may help relieve/reduce the pain:

  • Try and keep distribution of forces equal between the legs
  • When rolling in bed, put a pillow between your knees and roll with knees together on either side of the pillow
  • When getting in or out of the car, try and keep order ativan online your knee together and swivel on your bottom
  • When walking, use smaller steps to decrease the time spent on one leg
  • When walking, maintain good posture and try not to waddle because this places increasing stress on the spine and hips
  • Ensure that you use correct sitting and standing postures
  • Abdominal and buttock muscle strengthening exercises-  incorporate these into activities of daily living whenever possible:
    1. Gently lift your pelvic floor muscles and pull your lower abdominal’s in toward your spine
    2. Squeeze your bottom (particularly when lifting or getting up from sitting)
    3. Keep your back upright
    4. Keep breathing normally
  • Pelvic tilting
  • When seated, use arms to take more of the load (i.e. pushing off a chair with arms rather than an increased force through the legs)
  • Rest in horizontal position
  • Wear flat heels-well cushioned insole
  • You may need an abdominal brace to help decrease the load on the pelvis

 

Written by Michael Dermanksy

Senior Physiotherapist and founder of MD Health

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