Is Resistance Training for Older Adults Okay? This article was recently published by the National Strength and Conditioning Association and looks at the benefits of resistance/strength training in the older adult population.

The following key points from the article are heavily evidence based:

  • A properly designed resistance-based exercise program is safe for older adults.
  • These programs should follow the key principles of individualisation, periodisation, progressive overload, and should target 2-3 muscle groups per session at 70-85% of max intensity.
  • For positive health benefits, strength focused training should be conducted 2-3 times per week.

By following these guidelines, older adults can improve their strength, power, and neuro-muscular functioning. This also has the added benefits of improved mobility, enhanced independence, and better performance with activities of daily living.

Strength-based exercise programs can also improve an individual’s resistance to injury, as well as reducing the frequency and impact of falls. Another huge advantage of strength training is its benefits on psychological well-being and cognition.

In short, is Resistance Training for Older Adults Okay? The answer is yes!

Keep in mind these proven benefits are based on strength training 2-3 times per week, at around 80% of exercise intensity, as discussed in the bullet points above.

Want to know more?

If you want more information regarding this article or would like to book for a FREE full body assessment with one of our Physiotherapists or Exercise Physiologists, call us on 9857 0644 or email us at admin@md-health.com.au

 

Resistance Training for Older Adults

The purpose of this Position Statement is to provide an overview of the current and relevant literature, evaluate exerciseprogram variables, and provide evidence-based recommendations for resistance training for older adults. Current research has demonstrated that countering muscle disuse through resistance training is a powerful intervention to combat muscle strength loss, muscle mass loss (sarcopenia), physiological vulnerability (frailty), and their debilitating consequences on physical functioning, mobility, independence, chronic disease management, psychological well-being, and quality of life.

Read more here.

 

Author: Michael Dermansky

Michael has now been working in physiotherapy for over 20 years, since graduating from Melbourne University in 1998 and is even more passionate about getting the best outcomes for clients than he was then.Michael is always studying and looking for new and innovative ways to improve the service at MD Health, including and not limited to the ideas from the fitness industry and great customer service companies. In his spare moments, he loves spending time with his two children, Sebastian and Alexander and hopefully taking them skiing more and more often.

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