Pain science continues to evolve and is continuing to shape the way we approach managing and measuring pain combined with injury, such as mechanical back pain.

Pain is a complex feeling, affected no only by injury, but also by a person’s previous experience of pain, their cultural background, their feeling of how much the pain affects their life and the social support someone has around them when in pain.

This article suggests that simple measures of pain or ways of measuring pain, such as the visual analogue scale, used quite extensively in the medical industry, by rating your pain out of 10 (10 being the worst imaginable pain and 0 being no pain) is not really enough to capture the result of pain in a person’s life.

New tools such as the “pain conversion” aims to capture not only the person’s individual perception of pain, but also how pain affects a person’s ability to perform activities in the presence of pain.

At MD Health we have also evolved our questioning about pain and ways of measuring pain, focusing in on very specific goals about how pain affect’s a person’s life and getting a very clear picture of what managing a person’s pain would mean in their life.  This hugely improves our ability to help our clients improve their relationship with pain and get their life back once again.

Watch this space as our knowledge of pain science continues to develop further.

Want to know more?

If you want more information regarding this article or would like to book for a FREE full body assessment with one of our Physiotherapists or Exercise Physiologists, call us on 9857 0644 or email us at admin@md-health.com.au

 

Why the way healthcare professionals measure patient pain might soon be changing

The last time you went to see a doctor, it was probably because you were in pain – it’s by far the main reason people access the health service. And if you did go because of pain, your doctor probably asked you to rate it on a scale from zero to ten. Zero being no pain and ten being the worst pain you can imagine. This pain scale is so simple and intuitive, that it’s hard to imagine a time when doctors didn’t have it.

 

 

Author: Michael Dermansky

Michael has now been working in physiotherapy for over 20 years, since graduating from Melbourne University in 1998 and is even more passionate about getting the best outcomes for clients than he was then.Michael is always studying and looking for new and innovative ways to improve the service at MD Health, including and not limited to the ideas from the fitness industry and great customer service companies. In his spare moments, he loves spending time with his two children, Sebastian and Alexander and hopefully taking them skiing more and more often.

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